27
Jul

About Pocket Pets

Gerbils & Hamsters

Gerbils are small rodents originating from the desert areas of Eastern Europe, Asia, and Africa. Their long tails help them to balance on their hind legs. They’re social animals who prefer to live in family groups. Hamsters are nocturnal rodents that originated in the Middle East. They prefer a life of solitude, but they make interesting pets. They come in many colors and types of coats.

Mice & Rats

Pet mice come in an amazing array of colors. And they are always busy and playful. As weird as it sounds, rats are a very good choice of pet for households with responsible children. They are gentle, intelligent, interactive, and can be taught numerous tricks! They’re also relatively easy to care for (if housed correctly and given proper diet.)

Rabbits

Rabbits are very popular pets and can be kept indoors or outdoors, if properly housed. Most indoor rabbits can be litter-trained. Providing good nutrition, exercise, and gnawing toys will help keep them healthy. But, remember, they are prone to diseases if stressed or kept in unsanitary conditions.

Guinea Pigs & Chinchillas

Guinea pigs, also known as “cavies,” are from South America. And they do have some special dietary needs. However, if these needs are met, they make very good pets. The first time you pet a chinchilla, the first thing you’ll nice is his amazing softness. It’s important to have the proper housing ready BEFORE taking home your guinea pig or chinchilla. And you’ll also want to know as much as possible about their behavior, diet, and common diseases.

Hedgehogs & Sugar Gliders

The African hedgehog is becoming increasingly popular as a pet. Hedgehogs are insectivores, which burrow underground in the wild. They need warm temperatures, a high protein diet, and like to swim and climb. Sugar gliders, also known as honey gliders, are marsupials. Their long tails and gliding membrane between the front and rear legs give them the capability of gliding long distances. Both hedgehogs and sugar gliders are nocturnal, not domesticated, and require special diets. It is important to understand their behavior, husbandry and nutrition, and have the proper housing ready before getting one as a pet.

Keeping your Pet Safe

The following items are all dangerous to some degree if ingested, nibbled, or placed in contact with your pet. Some can cause death almost instantly. Others may cause only a mild reaction, but it is best to remove them from any areas where they would be in contact with your small pet. This is not a complete list, so if you are in any doubt about something that your pet has eaten or been in contact with, please contact AEAVS at (901) 624-9002 or the National Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435. (They charge $50.00 per case.)

Common hazards to avoid:

Acetaminophen (found in Tylenol)
Acetone
Alcohol
Ammonia
Antifreeze
Aspirin
Bleach
Boric acid
Brass cleaner
Caffeine
Camphophenique
Carbon monoxide
Charcoal lighter
Chlorine
Chocolate
Christmas tinsel
Coffee
Cola
Copper cleaner
Corn removers
Crayons
Deodorants
Deodorizers
Detergents
Disinfectants
Drain cleaner
Dry cleaning fluid
Easter-basket grass
Fabric dye
Fabric softener
Flea/tick products
Floor polish
Furniture polish
Gasoline
Gun cleaner
Gun powder
Hair dyes
Herbicides
Hexachlorophene
Insecticides
Iodine
Kerosene
Laxatives
Lead
Lighter fluid
Lye
Matches
Medicines
Mineral spirits
Model glue
Mothballs
Muriatic acid
Nail polish
Oven cleaner
Shoe polish
Silver polish
Sleeping pills
Snail bait
Soaps
Solvents
Spot remover
Spray starch
Sulfuric acid
Suntan lotions
Super Glue
Tar
Toilet bowl cleaner
Turkey bones
Turpentine
Wart remover
Wax
Weed killer
Window cleaner
Wood preservative
Wood stain

In addition to being a full-service animal hospital for Pocket Pets,  we offer FREE training on how to care for your pet.

Supplemental Sources: www.peteduction.com

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